Long Tube Header Installation Notes

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Long Tube Header Installation Notes

Post  jshertx on Mon Aug 15, 2011 4:11 pm

I hope everyone had a great Memorial Day weekend! I spent saturday installing headers on the 2006 M6 goat. After methodically reviewing Doric's header installation instrutions for several days last week, I jumped in and started wrenching. The install took roughly 8 hours to complete, and I have some notes, tips, and comments to share with those willing to take on this venture.

Installation instructions-
The beneficial instructions are ranked in the following order: Doric's sticky on ls1gto.com, Supermaxx by Dynomax instructions, Stainless Works, and sadly Kook's being the worst. Doric's is very helpful, but there are a few things that I didn't need so I'm not sure if its a year specific issue or maybe a little, "better to have and not need, than to need and not have".
1. I didn't need any O2 extensions. The kits, instructions, and every comment on the forums calls for extensions. I'm not sure if the 2004 goats and automaters need them, but for you 2005-2006 goats....YOU DON'T NEED THEM!

2. Doric advises on getting a set of crows foot wrenches to tackle the power steering lines. I used standard sae wrenches with no problems. I had a set of metric crows feet, but the two sizes mentioned by Doric were not in the set...wtf?

3. O-rings? I don't know about this one. I was very careful removing the power steering lines, and I didn't see any o-rings on the end of the lines. When I reinstalled them, there were no leaks. So maybe the o-rings are seated in the female connection?

4. Doric is not kidding about those O2 sensors being a sombitch to break free!! I had one front sensor that really liked its home, and after I rounded off the hex I dumped the whole damn thing in the dumster. I gladly paid $45 for a new Bosch from O'reilly. Yes, I soaked in wd-40, tried a wrench, tried with a O2 sensor socket (very handy by the way with all the rest), and then a impact wrench which shit the hex....so hasta la vista!

5. When you go to disconnect the steering knuckle from the rack, do yourself a favor and mark the "C"/rack shaft/rack with something you can see. Sure locking the wheels and not turning the steering wheel are easier said than done. When you get that purdy header in place(unattached per instructions), you have very little room to work. I had to adjust the knuckle to get it on the shaft and get the knuckle bolt in place. I was tired and failed to think about getting it lined up in the same place it came off. My steering wheel is now upside down! This is what I suggest...before you disconnect the knuckle, turn the steering where you have good access to replace the bolt when you disassemble, and then mark with something visible so you know where everything lines up. This way if you have to turn it a little (not much or you can mess up the steering wheel innards) to get it back together you won't end up with a unside down steering wheel when the tires are straight. Note: If your reading this after-the-fact, then you probably have a knuckle bolt that is jammed tight from being in a "bind". You will probably need to get professional mechanic to assist so you don't break the knuckle bolt or trash your steering innards.

6. I would change the oil just for insurance if something fell in the oil pan while removing and reinstalling the dipstick, and replace the plugs (if needed) since you already have the old ones out.

I hope this helps.



2006 Torrid Red M6 1 of 380
412 rwhp 382 rwtq
Vararam OTRCAI
Kooks 1 7/8 Headers
Kooks Catted Mids
TSP Torquer V2 Camshaft
TSP Dyno Tune
GMM Ripshifter
Custom Magnaflow Catback with X-pipe and Magnapacks
AR822 "Phantom" Wheels

"Drive it like you stole it; Burn it like you own it!"
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jshertx

Posts : 134
Join date : 2011-03-21
Age : 44
Location : Midland, Tx

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